Children

Researchers in the United States have conducted a study showing that the antibody response to vaccination designed to protect against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) wanes substantially over time among patients receiving maintenance dialysis. The team’s study of more than 1,500 individuals found that antibody titers against the COVID-19 causative agent – severe acute respiratory syndrome
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Allergic reactions to the new mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccines are rare, typically mild and treatable, and they should not deter people from becoming vaccinated, according to research from the Stanford University School of Medicine. The findings will be published online Sept. 17 in JAMA Network Open. We wanted to understand the spectrum of allergies to the
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Patients with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are three times more likely to die from COVID-19 than the general population. Their heightened risk is due to a variety of causes: pre-existing health conditions, such as respiratory problems or obesity; increased likelihood of living in group homes, taking shared transportation, and being exposed to people outside
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Eighteen months into the covid-19 pandemic, with the delta variant fueling a massive resurgence of disease, many hospitals are hitting a heartbreaking new low. They’re now losing babies to the coronavirus. The first reported covid-related death of a newborn occurred in Orange County, Florida, and an infant has died in Mississippi. Merced County in California
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Six stages of engagement in treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) have been reported by researchers at Boston Medical Center based on a diverse study, inclusive of parents of predominantly racial and ethnic minority children with ADHD. Published in Pediatrics, this new framework has been informed by the experiences of parents throughout the various stages that
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In a systematic review, researchers assessed the diagnostic value of certain physical symptoms that children may display that could indicate a urinary tract infection. The team performed literature reviews of the most prominent medical research databases from inception until Jan. 20, 2020 for studies reporting specific diagnostic accuracy data for clinical signs and symptoms compared
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The initial period of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic did not seriously affect children partly due to their relative isolation from sources of infection via school closures. However, the delta variant of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) that is currently spreading has affected children more than that initial period. Study: The
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Although severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection typically affects children only mildly, multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) or pediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome (PIMS) is a serious but rare complication occurring after infection. PIMS or MIS-C symptoms in affected children PIMS or MIS-C usually occurs 2 to 6 weeks after SARS-CoV-2 infection, and
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Hospitalized COVID-19 patients are substantially more likely to harbor autoantibodies -;antibodies directed at their own tissues or at substances their immune cells secrete into the blood -; than people without COVID-19, according to a new study. Autoantibodies can be early harbingers of full-blown autoimmune disease. If you get sick enough from COVID-19 to end up
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Researchers in the United States have warned that as of July 15th this year (2021), the level of population immunity against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) – the agent that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) – may still have been insufficient to contain infection outbreaks and safely return to pre-pandemic social behavior. As
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Particulate matter (PM) is a major component of air pollution that is increasingly associated with long-term consequences for the health and development of children. In a study recently published in Nature’s Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine, Natalie Johnson, PhD, associate professor at the Texas A&M University School of Public Health, and her co-authors synthesized the
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More than 70 percent of breastfeeding women take some form of medication, but 90 percent of those medications are not appropriately labeled for pregnant or lactating women. This means the drugs are taken “off-label” or without Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval, largely because they have never been tested in this population. Even less is
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A new study by UT Southwestern scientists indicates that an enzyme called protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A) appears to be a major driver of preeclampsia, a dangerous pregnancy complication characterized by the development of high blood pressure and excess protein in the urine. The finding, published in Circulation Research, could lead to new treatments for preeclampsia
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In December 2020, two novel messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines for SARS-CoV-2 received emergency use authorization from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration; however, the early trials excluded lactating women, leading to questions about their safety in this specific population. In a recent study, published in the online edition of Breastfeeding Medicine, researchers at University of
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Following media reports of children with epilepsies reportedly deriving benefits from medical marijuana (or cannabis-based medicinal products) accessed abroad, the UK government allowed clinicians to prescribe these products. A review published in Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology explores the science behind cannabis-based medicinal products in pediatric epilepsies and highlights areas that warrant additional research. The
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