Diabetes

COVID-19, Inflammation, Obesity, and Diabetes Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) viral infection, like other infections, triggers an inflammatory response that is usually confined to the respiratory system. However, there is evidence that in a full-blown case, almost all systems of the body may be involved. In addition, there is the syndrome of cytokine storm, characterized by
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Abstract The worldwide outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been an unprecedented pandemic. Early on, even as the signs and symptoms of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) were first characterized, significant concerns were articulated regarding its potential impact on people with chronic disease, including type 1 diabetes. Information about the basic and
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Abstract Eighteen months into the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) (coronavirus disease 2019 [COVID-19]) pandemic, epidemiologic studies indicate that diabetes is a central contributor to severe COVID-19 morbidity, and, conversely, COVID-19 has had a devastating effect on the population with diabetes. In this literature synthesis, we summarize the relationship of diabetes to COVID-19–related
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Hypertension is one of the leading causes of death worldwide (1). In 2019, 20.3% of all adult female deaths and 18.2% of all adult male deaths were attributed to high systolic blood pressure (SBP) globally (1). Population-based surveys from diverse settings have shown that many adults with high blood pressure (BP) are not appropriately diagnosed
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Hot oil–based frying is a popular cooking method that makes food more appealing in texture and aromatic, thus improving palatability. Fried foods are considered unhealthy because frying may increase the energy density of foods and therefore energy intakes as well as deteriorate oils through the process of oxidation and hydrogenation, leading to a loss of
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Accurate surveillance of diabetes is crucial for establishing relevant policies of diabetes prevention and control. Previous studies estimated the trends in diabetes among adults in the U.S.; however, many did not consider results of the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) (1), and those studies that included the OGTT results reported a higher prevalence of undiagnosed
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The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic may have delayed care for chronic disease (1). We sought to examine factors associated with total and virtual health care use for primary care visits for patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) during the pandemic. Using our electronic medical record, we identified patients in the Cleveland Clinic Health System
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Although recent clinical trials of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) use have shown positive glycemic benefit (1,2), outcomes outside the research setting may differ and real-world studies over a long time period are limited. In April 2017, CGM was fully subsidized in Australia for people living with type 1 diabetes (T1D) <21 years. Perth Children’s Hospital
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Diabetes is a major risk factor for death in those with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection (1). However, even those with diabetes who do not have a COVID-19 infection have an increased risk for mortality compared with those without diabetes (2). In the current study, we focused on hospitalized patients with diabetes and compared those
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The data presented by Dunne et al. (1,2) are clear and add to the growing literature describing hurdles faced by women in health care and academia. Gender disparities are evident in diabetes-related professions, and in the structure of diabetes associations and governmental research funding sources, these disparities are unfortunately no surprise. As pointed out by
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To change the future you need a firm grip on history. Successful implementation of strategies to catalyze evolution of gender parity requires a coherent plan with clear deliverables. The article by Dunne et al. (1,2), simultaneously published in Diabetes and Diabetes Care, provides a much-needed foundation that defines the scope of the problem within the
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Introduction Over one-half of the population self-identifies as female (1). Nearly 60% of individuals earning undergraduate and master’s degrees in the U.S. are female. Women are also well represented among persons earning MD degrees (47%) and PhD degrees in biological sciences (49%) (2,3). However, while women enter these academic pipelines at near-equal rates, they remain
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We welcome Drs. Foer and Cahill sharing their recent findings (1,2) on the association of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists with fewer respiratory disease exacerbations and providing their perspective on our study (3). One of the main challenges researchers encounter when conducting comparative effectiveness studies of glucose-lowering agents is selecting the most appropriate comparator (4).
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We read with interest the article by Albogami et al. (1) on the association of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) and respiratory exacerbations among patients with asthma and/or chronic obstructive respiratory disease (COPD). In particular, the main conclusion that GLP-1RA initiation may be associated with a subsequent decrease in respiratory exacerbations echoes our findings
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Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has mandated substantive changes in health care provision to minimize the risk of transmission within health care facilities. Introduction of physical distancing, a heightened focus on hand hygiene and workplace cleanliness, and widespread moves to telehealth provision have been observed (1,2). However, little is known about the impact of the pandemic
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People with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and preexisting type 1 diabetes (T1D) are at high risk of diabetes-related outcomes such as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hospitalization (1). For people with elevated glucose levels, infections could further exacerbate the risk of acute complications. As part of the management of T1D, the use of diabetes technology including
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The number of patients with diabetes is expected to increase by 51% worldwide within the next 25 years, with diabetes complications resulting in high health costs (1). Consequently, comprehensive diabetes care is essential to control disease progression. Pharmacists are able to contribute to diabetes care in different settings (2,3). However, large randomized controlled trials for
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How do I use an at-home test? Instructions will vary depending on the type and brand of test kit. Below are examples of some common at-home tests and how they are performed. Pregnancy Test Used to diagnose pregnancy by checking for a hormone called human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG). HCG is normally only produced during pregnancy.
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What is a glucagon blood test? This test measures the amount of glucagon in the blood. Glucagon is a hormone made by the pancreas. It helps control your body’s level of glucose (blood sugar). Glucose is your body’s main source of energy. When glucose levels drop, the pancreas releases glucagon into the bloodstream. This triggers
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Abstract OBJECTIVE Disparities in type 1 diabetes related to use of technologies like continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) and utilization of diabetes care are pronounced based on socioeconomic status (SES), race, and ethnicity. However, systematic reports of perspectives from patients in vulnerable communities regarding barriers are limited. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS To better understand barriers, focus
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